Australia is both home to the world’s oldest continuous cultures, as well as one third of all the known uranium on Earth. Australia is therefore a critical site for understanding the nuclear fuel cycle as future cultural and environmental heritage.︎

Principal investigator: N.A.J. Taylor︎ 
Institutional partner: TBA
Key output:
a digital humanities project in development︎
Sponsors:
Deakin University, Killam Trusts, and The University of British Columbia
External funding: $350,000




The Atomic Photographers Guild is the pre-eminent collective dedicated to visualising all aspects of the nuclear age. Formed in 1987 by Robert Del Tredici, the Guild has since amassed an archive of photographic negatives and prints from more than forty photographers across seven decades. The collection begins with the world’s two first atomic photographers: Berlyn Brixner, the United States’ government’s head photographer of the Manhattan Project, and Yoshito Matsushige, the only photographer to document the atomic destruction of Hiroshima from inside that city on August 6, 1945. Despite the significance of the Guild’s archive, the collection has yet to be formally catalogued and digitised.︎

Principal investigator: N.A.J. Taylor︎with the Guild’s Advisory Board 
Institutional partner: Atomic Photographers Guild︎
Sponsor/s: Australian Academy of the Humanities︎

Key output: cataloguing and digitisation of the Guild’s Yoshito Matsushige, Beryl Brixner, and Robert Del Tredici archive︎
External funding: $2,000


I began making photographs of Australian uranium mining sites in the early 2000s whilst working as an applied ethicist in the institutional investment industry, although I did not begin exhibiting or publishing my nuclear photography until 2009. The process of making photographic images, and the decision to publish some of them, has increasingly informed how I both comprehend and communicate the spatial and temporal enormity of nuclear harms. To date fieldwork of nuclear sites has been conducted in Australia, Belgium, England, Estonia, France, Germany, Finland, Iran, Israel, Scotland, South Africa, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States.︎

Principal investigator: N.A.J. Taylor︎
Institutional partner: Atomic Photographers Guild︎
Key output:
an award-winning essay︎