Breakthroughs in nuclear knowledge occur by traversing disciplinary and cultural boundaries—with others. The Nuclear Humanities Collaboratory documents just some of that work.
2011-ongoing:  Archives
2011-ongoing:  Antipodean 
2002-ongoing:  Exposures
2014-on hold:  Reimaginings
2009-on hold:  Dialogues

Australia is both home to the world’s oldest continous cultures, as well as one third of all the known uranium on Earth. Australia is therefore a critical site for understanding the nuclear fuel cycle as future cultural and environmental heritage.︎

Principal investigator: N.A.J. Taylor︎ 
Institutional partner: TBA
Key output:
a Scalar book project in development︎
Sponsors:
Deakin University, Killam Trusts, and The University of British Columbia
External funding: $125,000



Richard Routley/Sylvan is widely regarded as having pioneered the academic subfield of Environmental Philosophy. Less well known are his contributions to nuclear thought which were mostly self-published from his office in the 1970s and 80s. Through archival research, this project performs the most thoroughgoing investigation into Sylvan’s nuclear ethics and politics ever undertaken.︎

Principal investigator: N.A.J. Taylor︎ Institutional partner: John Denis Fryer Memorial Library of Australian Literature︎
Key output:
a monograph and companion Omeka digital exhibition︎
Sponsor:
The University of Queensland
External funding: $20,000



People tend to think of "harm" as limited to the individual human body or psyche. However, nuclear harms violate not only the human body, but also the biosphere on which all life depends. Despite this, ethical thinking on the nuclear age remains human-centred. To render these human-biosphere connections visible in nuclear discourse, this project problematizes Andrew Linklater's efforts to globalise the liberal harm principle by (re)constructing the Antipodean nuclear philosophy of the late environmental philosopher, Richard Routley/Sylvan, through archival research.︎

Principal investigator: N.A.J. Taylor︎ 
Institutional partner: John Denis Fryer Memorial Library of Australian Literature︎
Key output: an award-winning doctoral thesis︎
Sponsors:
Australian Federal Government and The University of Queensland
External funding: $110,000


The question of whether and how to communicate the problem of nuclear harm into the far-future to avoid intrusion is a vexing one. Following a film series and public dialogue, the decision was made to, first, print a handful of photographic images taken inside the Onkalo facility on stoneware ceramic, and, second, to deposit those tablets inside saliferous (i.e., flowing) salt deposits dating more than forty million years old in Hallstatt, Austria. The stoneware medium and salt storage method promises to preserve the images for at least 10,000 years.︎

Principal investigator: N.A.J. Taylor︎ 
Institutional partner: Memory of Mankind︎
Key output:
an exhibition︎ 
Sponsors: Sterling Archer; Bob and Wendy Ashcroft; Alex Bagg; Ellise Barkley; Jyoti Blenclowe; Jessie Boylan; Paul Brown; Chris Bunting; Anthony Burke; Richard Butcher; Elliot Chapple; Ruth Charters; Daniel Clifton; Gavin and Jess Crawcour; Andrew Evans; Lucas Gibson; Julian Hewitt; Brodie Higgs; Avon Hudson; Andrew Hustwaite; Redi and Evald Koobak; Michael Lake; Luca Lana; Benjamin Law; Sophie and Tim Mattick; Cindy McGrath; Leeann McKnight; Chris Mosely; Geoff and Sue Nicholson; Andrew Ritchie; Jesse Sutton; R.H. and J.M.L. Taylor; Sue Wareham; Nicola Weston.︎ 
External funding: $6,500