Breakthroughs in nuclear knowledge occur by traversing disciplinary and cultural boundaries—with others. The Nuclear Humanities Collaboratory documents just some of that work.
2011-ongoing:  Archives
2011-ongoing:  Antipodean 
2002-ongoing:  Exposures
2014-on hold:  Reimaginings
2009-on hold:  Dialogues

Australia is both home to the world’s oldest continuous cultures, as well as one third of all the known uranium on Earth. Australia is therefore a critical site for understanding the nuclear fuel cycle as future cultural and environmental heritage.︎

Principal investigator: N.A.J. Taylor︎ 
Institutional partner: TBA
Key output:
a digital humanities project in development︎
Sponsors:
Deakin University, Killam Trusts, and The University of British Columbia
External funding: $350,000




The Atomic Photographers Guild is the pre-eminent collective dedicated to visualising all aspects of the nuclear age. Formed in 1987 by Robert Del Tredici, the Guild has since amassed an archive of photographic negatives and prints from more than forty photographers across seven decades. The collection begins with the world’s two first atomic photographers: Berlyn Brixner, the United States’ government’s head photographer of the Manhattan Project, and Yoshito Matsushige, the only photographer to document the atomic destruction of Hiroshima from inside that city on August 6, 1945. Despite the significance of the Guild’s archive, the collection has yet to be formally catalogued and digitised.︎

Principal investigator: N.A.J. Taylor︎with the Guild’s Advisory Board 
Institutional partner: Atomic Photographers Guild︎
Sponsor/s: Australian Academy of the Humanities︎

Key output: cataloguing and digitisation of the Guild’s Yoshito Matsushige, Beryl Brixner, and Robert Del Tredici archive︎
External funding: $2,000

Richard Routley/Sylvan is widely regarded as having pioneered the academic subfield of Environmental Philosophy. Less well known are his contributions to nuclear thought which were mostly self-published from his office in the 1970s and 80s. Through archival research, this project performs the most thoroughgoing investigation into Sylvan’s nuclear ethics and politics ever undertaken.︎

Principal investigator: N.A.J. Taylor︎ Institutional partner: John Denis Fryer Memorial Library of Australian Literature︎
Key output:
a monograph and companion Omeka digital exhibition︎
Sponsor:
The University of Queensland
External funding: $20,000



People tend to think of "harm" as limited to the individual human body or psyche. However, nuclear harms violate not only the human body, but also the biosphere on which all life depends. Despite this, ethical thinking on the nuclear age remains human-centred. To render these human-biosphere connections visible in nuclear discourse, this project problematizes Andrew Linklater's efforts to globalise the liberal harm principle by (re)constructing the Antipodean nuclear philosophy of the late environmental philosopher, Richard Routley/Sylvan, through archival research.︎

Principal investigator: N.A.J. Taylor︎ 
Institutional partner: John Denis Fryer Memorial Library of Australian Literature︎
Key output: an award-winning doctoral thesis︎
Sponsors:
Australian Federal Government and The University of Queensland
External funding: $110,000